Strip The Stigma

An engagement toolkit for high schools to stimulate conversations around the body-based stigma that affects our youth.

Our group’s mission is to decrease the shame felt by high school students, partly induced by our collective insecurities with food, in order to increase positive self-esteem, body image and ultimately self love.  Why are we doing this? Because unnecessary shame causes so much pain in our lives. 
Theory of Change:
If we implement banners (what makes you feel disgusting and what makes you feel like you) into high schools, then students might be able to release negative feelings/thoughts about themselves because the stigma around body image and self esteem will be decreased by recognizing how pervasive these feelings are.

  • We are challenging high schools in Simcoe County to use our tool kit and erect their own interactive mural, signaling a permission for students to share their words in order to generate conversation around Food Insecurity. 
Toolkit Materials

Download EPS Files

– Two Banners (one black and one white)
– Permanent Sharpie Markers (Black for white banner, and colours for the black banner)

Getting Started

Step 1: Watch the motivational video “Strip The Stigma”

Step 2: Put up banners in cafeteria for everyone to see & reach

Step 3: Read the banner & grab a marker

Step 4: Now write something anonymously

Step 5: Think about a time where you felt disgusted & a time where you feel like YOU

Resources & Research

“Shame is the most disturbing experience individual’s ever have about themselves; no other emotion feels more deeply disturbing because in the moment of shame the self feels wounded from within.”

“Shame is the intensely painful feeling that we are unworthy of love. “
~Brene Brown

“Shame should be reserved for the things we choose to do, not the circumstances that life puts on us.“
~Ann Patchett

“When I talk about shame I’m not talking about anyone actually DOING anything wrong. I’m talking about the FEELING and the thoughts that we are somehow wrong, defective, inadequate, not good enough, or not strong enough.”
~Jane Botlton

Reference:
(2006) Shame Resilience Theory: A Grounded Theory Study on Women and Shame. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services: 2006, Vol. 87, No. 1, pp. 43-52.

Book (via Amazon.ca):
THOUGHT IT WAS JUST ME (BUT IT ISN’T): TELLING THE TRUTH ABOUT PERFECTIONISM, INADEQUACY, AND POWER, Brené Brown, Ph.D., LMSW https://www.amazon.ca/Thought-Was-Just-isnt-Perfectionism/dp/1592403352/ref=sr_1_1

Companion Worksheet (via brenebrown.com):
THOUGHT IT WAS JUST ME (BUT IT ISN’T): TELLING THE TRUTH ABOUT PERFECTIONISM, INADEQUACY, AND POWER (Gotham, 2007) Brené Brown, Ph.D., LMSW DOWNLOAD https://brenebrown.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/ITIWJMe_Worksheet.pdf

Theme: Shame
Initial Sponsor: High Schools Program: Child and Youth Care
Semester: Winter Semester 2018
Designed For: Highschool Students Supporting: Youth
Additional Keywords: self-esteem, body image, self love, shame, disgusting Creators:
Taylor Long, Bryden Morrison & Meagan Robinson

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ccsi@georgiancollege.ca

Georgian College Orillia
825 Memorial Ave.,
Orillia ON
L3V 6S2